Colonial Williamsburg – 22 December 2021

Some time in the past 20 years, we visited Colonial Williamsburg in the summer. The temperature was hot and the town was very crowded. It was a delight to come back with my friend, who knows Williamsburg in detail, with the weather being sunny temps in the 40s and 50s. However, not all the buildings are open and the covid rules are in place. This didn’t stop us from enjoying the day.

Our morning starts by eating breakfast at a popular restaurant – Old Chickahominy House. Quaint house with various dining rooms and a gift shop. Excellent food and service.

Next a short drive, park and walk over to the main street of Colonial Williamsburg – Duke of Gloucester Street. Buildings are just opening up for tours, a horse and carriage drive by and the Raleigh Tavern tour is waiting for us.

Good stories are told about the history made within this building. Did you know Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Patrick Henry, James Madison and James Monroe lived in Williamsburg? Did you know Williamsburg was the capitol of colonial Virginia until Thomas Jefferson moved the capitol to Richmond in 1791? Love Williamsburg and the history told by the tour guides.

Another house a must to tour is the Wythe House. Restored with period furnishings and wall paper, not particularly my taste in 2021!

The Silversmith shop’s history was quite interesting. The shop was very small inside. Since there were no banks or money being printed in the early 1700’s, people would hold their wealth in silver that they had made into silverware, jewelry, platters, etc to show their wealth. When they needed ‘money’ they would go to the silversmith to ‘cash in’ on their wealth. Makes you understand better why people value their silver wares to this day.

A couple of ‘must see’ buildings are the Governor’s Palace and the Capitol. Again, the tour guides enlightened us with the historical facts and stories.

The Governor of the Colony of Virginia just before the Revolutionary War was Lord Dunmore. He was best know for fighting the Shawnee nation and winning. Thus the reason for displaying his 540 weapons in the front entrance hall to impress Williamsburg people and continue to keep the Native American hostages in fear before a treaty was signed.

This is where court was held. Lots of stories about some of the trials and sentences delivered. This was also the place where 112 citizens of Williamsburg in 1776 agreed to secede from England and form their own state. They were the first colony to do this and then communicated to the other colonies who soon followed. After this happened, Lord Dunmore fled the city because….you know the rest of the story.

The most beautiful items on the buildings during Christmas season are handmade fresh wreaths. These wreaths are creative and made only with real materials of the era. Really fun to look at with great appreciation – says someone who is not a crafter. 🙂

And who should appear before my wondering eyes – Santa Claus!

Just down the street, an ice skating rink with people enjoying and some holding on for dear life LOL

The day is a wrap with a delicious dinner at Le Yaca and a drive to see Williamsburg Inn’s lights and the main Christmas Tree. A very merry Christmas trip to Williamsburg.

One thought on “Colonial Williamsburg – 22 December 2021

  1. Oh how fun! I just love Williamsburg, especially beautiful at Christmas. Please wish Shirley a very Merry Christmas from me. Ann

    On Wed, Dec 22, 2021 at 8:52 PM Traveling Lynn and Steve wrote:

    > beyondnp2017 posted: ” Some time in the past 20 years, we visited Colonial > Williamsburg in the summer. The temperature was hot and the town was very > crowded. It was a delight to come back with my friend, who knows > Williamsburg in detail, with the weather being sunny temps in” >

    Like

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